Tui Quash Slug & Snail Control

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Available in: 400g

Have slugs and snails been munching on your carefully tended seedlings and plants, before you get a chance to enjoy them?

Tui Quash is a revolutionary low hazard formula which effectively controls slugs and snails preventing them from ruining your plants, and is safer to use around children, pets and wildlife than alternative metaldehyde or methiocarb based slug and snail baits. The active ingredient, Iron EDTA Complex, is also used as a food additive, a medicine to cure anaemia (iron deficiency) and as a trace element fertiliser. It is rated less toxic than table salt for people, yet is a potent stomach poison for slugs and snails.

Tui Quash lasts longer under damp conditions when slugs and snails are most active. When it breaks down, plants can utilise the iron chelate for healthy growth.

Use Tui Quash throughout your garden to protect your seedlings, potted plants, vegetables and flowers and enjoy a slug and snail free garden!

Active Ingredient: 52.3g/kg Iron EDTA Complex in the form of a pellet.

Benefits

  • Safer for use around children.
  • Safer for use around pets.
  • Safer for use around wildlife.

Directions for use

  • Sprinkle Tui Quash evenly around seedlings and plants, do not place in heaps. Use 50 pellets (approx. 1 teaspoon) per square metre of garden.
  • For best results apply after rain or watering.
  • Do not apply to the foliage of edible plants, or to plants close to harvest.

Precautions:

Wash hands and exposed skin thoroughly after using. Tui Quash contains a taste deterrent to deter consumption by children and pets. The active ingredient in this product is Iron Chelate and does not contain metaldehyde or methiocarb. Tui Quash may be attractive to dogs, keep away from dogs. If consumed in large quantities it may be toxic. If an animal ingests Tui Quash contact your veterinary surgeon.

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